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What is
prediabetes?

What is
prediabetes?


You’ve probably heard of type-2 diabetes before, but have you ever heard of prediabetes?
 

Some peoples’ bodies cannot control blood glucose levels correctly because of a defect in the way that they produce or respond to insulin, the hormone that usually helps to return elevated blood glucose levels to normal. If your blood glucose levels are consistently high enough, your doctor will diagnose you as being diabetic. Having your blood glucose levels elevated for a long time can cause damage to many of the body’s organs,1 so it is important to correctly manage diabetes to maintain an appropriate blood glucose level, or better yet, to avoid the onset of diabetes entirely!


If your blood glucose is higher than normal, but not quite high enough to be considered diabetic, you are prediabetic.2, 3, 4

People who are prediabetic are more likely to become diabetic than people who are not prediabetic. The good news is that even if you are prediabetic, diabetes can be avoided. Simple changes to your lifestyle can delay, and in some individuals, prevent diabetes from developing. So rather than being bad news, being identified as prediabetic gives you a second chance to make the changes necessary to hopefully avoid developing diabetes.

 

Prediabetes Vs. Diabetes

 

Prediabetes

In prediabetes, blood glucose levels are raised above healthy levels, but are not high enough to be in the diabetic range, indicating increased risk for developing diabetes.

 

There are no obvious signs or symptoms – 9 out of 10 people with prediabetes are completely unaware they are prediabetic.5


 
Finding out you are prediabetic gives you the opportunity to control your blood glucose levels before it progresses to diabetes; prediabetes may be your opportunity to turn things around.2

 

Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when there is not enough insulin in the blood to reduce blood glucose to a safe level.            

 

Symptoms include tiredness, increased thirst and hunger, and more frequent urination.6



 
Managing diabetes is vital to prevent irreversible damage to your organs due to high blood glucose levels.6


 

Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when there is not enough insulin in the blood to reduce blood glucose to a safe level.            

 

Symptoms include tiredness, increased thirst and hunger, and more frequent urination.6



 
Managing diabetes is vital to prevent irreversible damage to your organs due to high blood glucose levels.6



 



 

The Assessments2

Fasting plasma glucose 5.6–6.9 mmol/L (100–125 mg/dL)
2-hour plasma glucose 7.8–11.0 mmol/L (140–199 mg/dL)
HbA1c 5.7–6.4%
Fasting plasma glucose ≥7.0 mmol/L (≥126 mg/dL)
2-hour plasma glucose ≥11.1 mmol/L (≥200 mg/dL)
HbA1c ≥6.5%

Adapted from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 

 

Prediabetes: The facts

Download the prediabetes infographic here and print it to raise awareness of prediabetes

 

Thank you prediabetes,
for giving us a second chance!
 

1. Medline Plus. Prediabetes. Available at https://medlineplus.gov/prediabetes.html Accessed September 2017

2. ADA. Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes. Available at: http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/prediabetes/. Accessed September 2017

3. Family Doctor. Prediabetes. Available at: https://familydoctor.org/condition/prediabetes/ Accessed September 2017

4. Mayo Clinic. Prediabetes. Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/prediabetes/home/ovc-20270022 Accessed September 2017

5. CDC. The Surprising Truth About Prediabetes. 2017. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/features/diabetesprevention/index.html. Accessed September 2017.

6. Mayo Clinic. Type 2 Diabetes. Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20351199 Accessed September 2017